Studies on Moses

Rembrandt_-_Moses_with_the_Ten_Commandments

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image: Moses with the Ten Commandments

Artists: Rembrandt

The biblical story of Moses is well known by most people familiar with the Bible. Born in Egypt at the time the people of Israel were being oppressed by Pharaoh, Moses was called by God to present himself before the king of Egypt and demand that he let the people go out free.

Moses was reluctant to accept the mission God gave to him. Under the insistence of God, Moses returned to Egypt from Midian to lead a nation of slaves out of Egypt, to lead them to Mount Sinai so that Israel could establish a covenant with God, receive God’s law, and become God’s special people with a special mission in the world.

From the time Israel left Egypt, spent forty years in the wilderness, and arrived in the plains of Moab, Moses had been the only leader Israel knew. His life was marked by accomplishments and failures. However, in those difficult days in the wilderness, Moses remained faithful to God.

The studies below are not meant to provide a biography of Moses. Rather, these studies deal with several aspects of the life of Moses and his significance in the life and history of Israel.

Much more can and should be said about Moses. In the five books called “The Pentateuch,” also know as “The Five Books of Moses,” there are scores of amazing stories that reveal much about the character and work of Moses. These stories need to be read and studied. There is so much to learn about Moses. It is my purpose to continue writing posts on the work of Moses so that we may know more about this man to whom God spoke “face to face” (Numbers 12:8). Until then, enjoy these studies on Moses.

Studies on Moses

Moses as a Leader of the People

Exodus: The Oppression of Israel

Exodus: The Birth of Moses

Exodus: Moses Among His People

The Ordination of the Priest

Standing Stones: Reconciling With God

The Character of God

The Character of God as Seen Through the Liturgical Credo of Exodus 34:6-7

The Character of God as Seen Through the Liturgical Credo of Exodus 34:6-7 – Part 2

The Character of God as Seen Through the Liturgical Credo of Exodus 34:6-7 – Part 3

The Character of God as Seen Through the Liturgical Credo of Exodus 34:6-7 – Part 4

The Character of God as Seen Through the Liturgical Credo of Exodus 34:6-7 – Part 5

The Golden Calf

The Golden Calf: The Background of Israel’s Idolatry

The Making of the Golden Calf

The Golden Calf: Moses’ First Prayer

The Golden Calf: “Leave Me Alone”

Moses’ Two Mothers

Mount Nebo

Moses on Mount Nebo

Who Was the Moses of the Bible?

Did Moses Have a Cleft Lip?

Was Moses Left-handed?

The Five Books of Moses

Moses and the Exodus

The Exodus from Egypt: A New Explanation

Israel in the Wilderness of Sinai

The Geographical Challenges of the Sinai

God’s Covenant with Israel

Moses and Divine Providence

Moses’ Cushite Wife

Was Moses a Bigamist?

Moses and Pharaoh

Moses and His Crocodile

Were the Israelites in Egypt?

“Leave Me Alone”

Moses’ Prayer for Rebellious Israel

The God Who Answers Prayer

Did Moses Invent the Alphabet?

Moses and American History

Moses and Jesus Are Buried in India

A Modern-day Descendant of Moses

Moses: A Concert for Piano and Orchestra

Did Moses Exist?

Defending the Bible

Claude Mariottini
Emeritus Professor of Old Testament
Northern Baptist Seminary

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If you are looking for other series of studies on the Old Testament, visit the Archive section and you will find many studies that deal with a variety of topics.

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