King Tut’s Autopsy

King Tut Virtual Photo

Image: King Tut Virtual Picture

Credit: CNN

CNN has a brief article in which it reports the results of an autopsy performed on King Tut’s mummified remains. Below is an excerpt taken from the article:

(CNN) — King Tutankhamun’s golden, mummified remains tell only a partial story of an ancient Egyptian boy king who died under mysterious circumstances.

But a new “virtual autopsy” of King Tut’s body, shown in an upcoming BBC One documentary, has given historians a clearer picture of the young man’s life — and death.

Scientists used CT scans to recreate the first life-size image of Tutankhamun, one of the last rulers of the 18th Dynasty. King Tut ruled from 1333 B.C. until about 1323 B.C. Historians put his age at death at about 19.

Research published in The Journal of the American Medical Association in 2010 showed that King Tut may have died of malaria, possibly after suffering an infection in his broken leg. As seen in the new virtual autopsy photo, Tutankhamun’s left foot was also severely deformed; the inward angle suggests that he had a clubfoot. Researchers believe the boy king had Kohler disease, a rare bone disorder.

More than 100 walking sticks were found in Tut’s tomb; historians originally thought they represented his power, but it’s more likely Tut used them to get around.

You can read the article in its entirety by visiting CNN online.

You can also read the results of the original research: “Ancestry and Pathology in King Tutankhamun’s Family,” The Journal of the American Medical Association. The article is available free online.

Claude Mariottini
Professor of Old Testament
Northern Baptist Seminary

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