Studies on The Long Day of Joshua

On the day when the LORD gave the Amorites over to the Israelites, Joshua spoke to the LORD; and he said in the sight of Israel, ‘Sun, stand still at Gibeon, and Moon, in the valley of Aijalon.’ And the sun stood still, and the moon stopped, until the nation took vengeance on their enemies. Is this not written in the Book of Jashar? The sun stopped in midheaven, and did not hurry to set for about a whole day” (Joshua 10:12-13).

When Joshua fought against the five kings of Canaan, the army of Israel pursued the army of the Canaanites into the Valley of Aijalon. In order to ask for divine help to defeat the enemy, Joshua called upon the sun and the moon to stay in their place.

This astronomical event has produced much debate among those who read and interpret this text. Scholars have differed on how to interpret Joshua’s words. Atheists have rejected the possibility of this astronomical event calling it a myth or a scientific impossibility. Believers believe that the sun actually stopped in the sky for twenty-four hours.

My three posts on the long day of Joshua provide what I believe is the best interpretation of what happened on that day. You may have your own interpretation of this event. However, I ask you to carefully consider the interpretation I provide in these three studies.

In order to follow my presentation of this astronomical event, it is important that you read the three posts in the order they are listed.

These are the links for Studies on “The Long Day of Joshua”:

Rereading Joshua 10:12-13: The Long Day of Joshua

The Long Day of Joshua: In Search of Understanding – Part 1

The Long Day of Joshua: In Search of Understanding – Part 2

Claude Mariottini
Professor of Old Testament
Northern Baptist Seminary

This entry was posted in Book of Joshua, Joshua and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Studies on The Long Day of Joshua

  1. Jim says:

    Reblogged this on Zwinglius Redivivus and commented:
    Interesting, if not altogether utterly persuasive.

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