Jezebel’s Wedding Song – Part 2

In my previous post, I identified Psalm 45 as a wedding song. In that post, I identified the groom as Ahab, king of Israel, and the bride as Jezebel, the daughter of the King of Tyre.

In the present post, I use the language of Psalm 45 to describe the splendor of the king and the queen. Psalm 45, as quoted in this post, is a compilation of several translations of the Psalm.

The Splendor of the King

1. His appearance: “You are the most handsome of men.”

2. His gracious words: “Grace flows from your lips.”

3. His courage in battle: “Mighty warrior, strap your sword at your side.”

4. His administration of justice: “Ride on in majesty to victory for the defense of truth and justice.”

5. His victory in wars: “May your right hand win you great victories. May your arrows pierce the hearts of the king’s enemies; may the nations fall under your feet.”

6. The stability of his kingdom: “Your throne, God, is forever and ever.”

7. The righteousness of his kingdom: “The scepter of your kingdom is a scepter of justice. You love righteousness and hate what is evil.”

8. His divine gifts: “God, your God, has anointed you, more than any other king.”

9. The splendor of his reign: “Myrrh, aloes, and cassia perfume all your garments; from ivory palaces harps bring you joy.”

The Glories of the Queen

1. Her attendants: “Kings’ daughters and honorable women.”

2. Her dignity: “A king’s daughter.”

3. Her title: “The Queen.”

4. Her honor: “The bride of the king.”

5. Her place of honor: “She stands on the right hand of the king.”

6. Her Wardrobe: “Dressed with gold of Ophir.”

7. Her appearance: “Glorious in her golden gown.”

8. Her sacrifice: “Forget your people and your father’s house.”

9. Her reward: “Your royal husband delights in your beauty.”

The Wedding Song

(Dedication)

My heart is moved by a noble theme
as I compose my song for the king;
my tongue is the pen of a skillful writer.

(To the King)

You are the most handsome of men; grace flows from your lips.
Therefore God has blessed you forever.
Mighty warrior, strap your sword at your side.
You are so glorious, so majestic.

Ride on in majesty to victory for the defense of truth and justice.
May your right hand win you great victories.
May your arrows pierce the hearts of the king’s enemies;
may the nations fall under your feet.

Your throne, God, is forever and ever;
the scepter of your kingdom is a scepter of justice.
You love righteousness and hate what is evil;
therefore God, your God, has anointed you,
more than any other king, with the oil of joy.
Myrrh, aloes, and cassia perfume all your garments;
from ivory palaces harps bring you joy.

Kings’ daughters are among your honored women;
the queen stands at your right hand, adorned with gold from Ophir.

(To the Bride)

Bride of the king, listen to me,
forget your people and your father’s house,
for your royal husband delights in your beauty.
Honor him, for he is your lord.
The people of Tyre will bring you gifts,
rich people will try to win your favor.
In her palace the queen looks glorious in her golden gown.
In her colorful gown she is led to the king,
followed by her bridesmaids,
and they also are brought to the king.
They enter the king’s palace with gladness and rejoicing.

(To the King)

You, my king, will have many sons
to succeed your ancestors as kings,
and you will make them rulers over the whole earth.
My song will keep your name alive forever,
and everyone will praise you for all time to come.

References

Delitzsch, Franz. Biblical Commentary on the Psalms. Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1871.

Ewald, H. Commentary on the Psalms. Edinburgh: Williams and Norgate, 1880.

Schmidt, H. Die Psalmen. Tubingen: Mohr, 1934.

Jezebel’s Wedding:

Jezebel’s Wedding Song – Part 1

Jezebel’s Wedding Song – Part 2

Claude Mariottini
Professor of Old Testament
Northern Baptist Seminary

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2 Responses to Jezebel’s Wedding Song – Part 2

  1. Dr M says:

    >Your interpretation is attractive, to be sure. However, when we consider the text as a post-exilic collection, I find it difficult to imagine that looking back from the perspective of the now finally devout Persian period, that the editors would have knowingly chosen a song related to Ahab and his bride. IF it was unwittingly added to the collection simply for its exaltation of the king as a tool of YHWH, perhaps….As I stated, its an attractive interpretation, and I shall certainly consider it further. Thanks for sharing it….dmaltsberger@bua.edu

  2. >Dear Dr. M,Psalm 45 is included in a collection of psalms (Book 2) called the Elohistic psalms. Many of these psalms probably reflect the worship of God in the Northern Kingdom. Since there are no names associated with Psalm 45, it is possible that in post-exilic times, Psalm 45 was associated either with Solomon or with the Messiah; this is the traditional interpretation followed by Jewish and Christian scholars.I think that the application of Psalm 45 to Ahab and Jezebel is still a good possibility.Claude Mariottini

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